Requirements

Standards for admission are high. Applicants are expected to possess high character, aptitude, integrity and motivation suitable for a career in medicine. Other personal attributes considered include strong communication skills, extracurricular accomplishments and balanced life style including hobbies and recreational interests.

Key requirement: Follow your medical passion! 

Hilary Gallin treats a patient in Barnes-Jewish HospitalMeet Hilary Gallin, MD ’17, whose passion led her to help develop a multiyear curriculum aimed at training students to care for patients with disabilities. 

Read Hilary’s story »
View Hilary’s story »

Academic Requirements

Medical College Admissions Test

Must be completed before an application is considered. We accept MCAT results that are up to three years old at the time of application. Thus, when applying for the 2017 first-year class, MCAT test dates must be no older than 2013.

Hours of undergraduate study

At least 90 semester hours must be completed in an approved college or university prior to matriculation.

Required course work

A minimum of one year or equivalent advanced placement in

  • Biology
  • General or inorganic chemistry
  • Organic chemistry*
  • Physics
  • Calculus through integral and differential equations**

Possible substitutions

* One semester of biochemistry can be substituted for one semester of organic chemistry.
** Statistics can be substituted for one semester of calculus. In selected instances, one or more of these prerequisites may be waived by the Committee on Admissions.

A course in biochemistry, though not required, is encouraged.

Majors and areas of study

No single major is preferred. Although many applicants will have majored in science, engineering or math, applications from those who have majored in the humanities, social sciences or the arts are equally welcome.

International Students

Applicants for admission to Washington University School of Medicine that are not US citizens or US permanent residents, should be aware of our School’s policy regarding the financial documentation we require for issuance of a Visa by the U.S. Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Visa Services.  This policy applies to all applicants that are not citizens or permanent residents of the US, including DACA students.  Quoting from the Policy for International Students in the Bulletin of Washington University School of Medicine:

The admission decision at Washington University School of Medicine is based on academic and personal merit and not on the ability of the student to pay the costs of education. However, individuals who are not citizens of the United States of America or who do not hold U.S. Permanent Resident Visa status are not eligible for federal financial aid due to regulations covering many programs used by the School to fund financial assistance. Therefore, in order for the School to complete the required documents which are necessary for issuance of a Visa, the student must document, by a date and in a manner designated by the School, that the necessary amount of funds, as established by the School, is available to pay the costs of education (tuition and living expenses) for the anticipated period of enrollment, normally four years. Documentation of the required amount of financial resources may be by a letter of credit or by deposit of funds in an escrow account with a bank designated by the School. 

International and DACA students who are accepted for admission must provide the required financial documentation following acceptance by May 1st prior to matriculation.

Note that all accepted students including international students and DACA students are considered for merit scholarships.

Technical Standards Statement

Graduates of Washington University with a Doctor of Medicine degree are expected to have broad competence in the basic skills that underlie the general practice of medicine and surgery. All graduates must be able to take a history, examine a person, synthesize the findings into a diagnosis and plan of evaluation and treatment independently. Thus, medical students must possess the requisite sensory, motor, communicative and cognitive capabilities to accomplish these requirements in a reliable manner in order to be competent and safe medical practitioners.